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Bunin

Book Tips - Ivan Bunin

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1933 was awarded to Ivan Bunin "for the strict artistry with which he has carried on the classical Russian traditions in prose writing".

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Collected Stories

Although I have read many of the great Russian writers, only recently discovered Bunin. The 2007 translation by G. Hettlinger seems to make all Bunin's poetry available to the reader. It is extraordinary that he is not better known in the States; he makes a fascinating counterpoint to Chekhov - his stories are more imagistic perhaps, but unfold in the mind slowly, resonating with life.
/Myra Dorrell, United States
Very romantic and interesting life stories!
/Veronika, Russia

Light Breathing and Other Stories

I have visited many European countries, and I've noticed there are a lot of books by such Russian writers as A.P. Chekhov, F.M. Dostoevsky, L.N. Tolstoy and many others, but I have never met any books by I.A. Bunin. And I think it is an unpardonable omission, because Bunin was extremely talented writer, some of his short stories express much more than some big novels of some other writers. Bunin's prose teach us kindness and love. One can gain a lot from such Bunin's stories like 'The Light Breathing', 'Antonovskie Apples', 'The Dark Paths' etc. His prose is embodiment of Russian classic literature, Bunin himself was the last representative of primordial Russian school in literature, so, I think that everybody who likes Turgenev and Chekov will like Bunin. And everybody who does not like them probably will change his opinion after reading some Bunin's works.
/Timothy Bockov, Russia

Memories and Portraits (Vospominaniya)

Ivan A Bunin, after a year in the University of Moscow, left on a tour through Kharkov, Crimea, Italy, Turkey and countries of North Africa. Later on he visited England. France, however, was to become his place of residence later - where he died of a heart attack in 1953. I recommend his "Memories and Portraits" in which he states the reasons for his migrating from Russia. He says:- " No one can understand what the Russian revolution degenerated into who did not witness it with his own eyes. It was an utterly intolerable spectacle for anybody who still nurtured the belief that man is created on God's image. Accordingly, all those who could or so desired, fled from Russia. Among the fugitives were the majority of the most famous Russian writers; they left for the prime reason that in Russia, a futile death lay in wait for them at the hands of the first scoundrel they met, drunk with excess and impunity, with pillage, wine, blood and cocaine". A reason enough to quit one's Motherland, eh!
/Dilbag Firdausi, India

The Gentleman from San Francisco (Gospodin iz San-Frantsisko)

The second non-European writer (after RN Tagore) to win the Nobel Prize in Literature (in 1933) was Ivan A Bunin of the USSR. I like and recommend his book " The Gentleman From Francisco" which is on par with Tolstoy's Ivan Ilyich and Thomas Mann's Magic Mountain. All three are identical depicting the vanity of civilization and the presence of death as the only reality. The chief character in this book is a gentleman from San Francisco, who, along with his wife and daughter, remain anonymous throughout. They travel to the south of Italy, where the gentleman meets his inglorious doom in the reading room of a hotel even before he had tasted the pleasures for which he had gone there. A tragic-realism in a superb prose indeed.
/Dilbag Firdausi, India

The Life of Arsenyev (Zhizn arsen'eva: u istoka dnej)

For the strict artistry with which he has carried on the classical Russian traditions in prose writing.
/Vladislava, Albania
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MLA style: "Book Tips - Visitors Recommend". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/literature/books/comments.php?id=606&nextid=647&name=Bunin+Ivan+Alekseyevich>

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