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Le Clézio

Book Tips - Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2008 was awarded to Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio "author of new departures, poetic adventure and sensual ecstasy, explorer of a humanity beyond and below the reigning civilization".

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Desert (Désert)

How the author portrays the desert; how he portrays Europe from an unwanted visitor.
/Petter Danckwardt, Sweden
The beauty of the prose is powerful and rending.
/Keith Moser, United States

Onitsha

Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio Nobel prize winning book Onitsha I recommend to read because of Onitsha” tells the story of growing outrage of a twelve years old boy ”Fintan” born in1936, in Niece old town, lived with his very beautiful loving mother ‘”Maria Luica” he called her “Maou”, aunt “Rosa” and granny ”Aurelia”, traveled a long voyage of a month in 1948, over the sea along many dirty west African sea coasts by a cargo-ship “Surbay” aging three-hundred-ton to his English father” Geoffrey Allen” whom he never meet before and who was a stranger, lived and worked in “Ibusun” village of “Onitsha” [in united Africa office]- full of rivers, atmosphere, scenarios-sights, sounds, smells, poverty, begging children, dirty black native people. Fintan and Maou could recognize here first the intolerance, brutality of upper middle class society English District officers, Residents and European community in post war feudal & colonial system towards the African war prisoners and local people. Both of them realized– the harsh reality of African life and subsequent tragedy of war between Spain and Italy in 1940s.
/Mr. Rupak Bhattacharya, India

Révolutions

It moves around the world and takes a wide, historical grip on society and colonialism, and in the middle of all it is intimate and personal and and heartbreaking, when it comes to the betrayal of our own intentions of equality ... read it!
/Eva Akerlund, Sweden

Terra Amata (Terra amata)

Having never read any of his work before, I picked up Terra Amata, and became infatuated with the experimental nature of his writing, and the surreal dream-like woven plots. Le Clézio has an incredibly distinctive style for describing and filling the gaps in an ordinary station turning any and even the briefest moment of consciousness into a moment of wonder and joy at the beauty of the world, and life itself.
/Otto Willberg, United Kingdom

The African (L'Africain)

It is a very poetic and truly honest book.
/Željko, Croatia

The Book of Flights (Le livre des fuites)

It plays with the conventional method of story-telling without sacrificing entertainment.
/Daniel Adsett, Canada
This book is poetry in an unfamiliar guise. I read it aloud sometimes so beautiful is the writing. I found some very, oddly, familiar ideas: I've had similar thoughts of flight, similar imaginings of "who am I without my possessions, my people, my country. With all that gone ... what is left?" These are the afternoon daydreams you weren't even aware of - in the written word.
/Rebecca, United Kingdom

The Giants (Le Géants)

This book is amazingly experimental, creative, and original. It faces the individual soul against the soulessness of machines. I believe if this had been written by a North-American on the 80's it would be considered a masterpiece, hailed by every newspaper and translated by dozens of languages. But it was written in 1973 by a French, so people use to overlook it.
/Gustavo Vazquez, Brazil

Wandering Star (Étoile errante)

An outstanding piece of literature: a story on Jewish and Palestinian exile so well told by a person so foreign to Jewish or Palestinian identity; a prose that is so simple but that exposes so many emotions; and finally a sentimental but objective narrative that makes you weep.
/Erdem Tetik, United States
This book, epic in scope and detail, makes one think about what it means to be a refugee and not truly have a country in which to call home. Le Clézio looks at two different characters and how their refugee status, though different, shares the same level of degradation and uncertainty.
/Zachary Hardy, United States
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MLA style: "Book Tips - Visitors Recommend". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2013. Web. 20 Apr 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/literature/books/comments.php?id=832&nextid=817&name=Le+Cl%E9zio+Jean-Marie+Gustave>

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