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Laser - About

The Laser Challenge educational game and related reading are based on several Nobel Prize awarded discoveries in physics that are related to the invention of the laser.

 

First published: December 2002
Estimated play time: 20 min. +
Plug in requirements: Flash 5  »
Sound: yes
High score: Yes
Credits: Produced by Paregos for Nobelprize.org

Laser Challenge Game

What is a laser?
What are lasers used for?

Professor Photon has invented the super laser, and you have to arrange a laser party to celebrate! Your mission in this game is to collect points, CDs and snacks. Collect a star and answer its laser question correctly, and you'll receive bonus points. But watch out for the slackers and the snack crackers who will try to steal your party goodies. At the end of each level, you'll have to perform a laser task, such as recognising appliances that contain lasers and repairing faulty eyesight.  Collect enough CDs and snacks and you will have a laser party to remember -- collect as many points as you can and you could end up on the top 10 high-score list.

For instructions on how to play the game, click on the HELP button found at the bottom of the game window.

Reading: "Laser Facts"

Laser History (A timeline and an introduction)
About Laser
- What is a Laser?
- How does Laser Light Differ from Other Light?
- Stimulated Emission
- Everyday Use of Lasers
- Lining Up the Laser
- Correction of Vision Defects
- Nobel Prizes

Read "Laser Facts" »

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MLA style: "Laser - About". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 28 Jul 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/physics/laser/about.html>

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