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Microscopes - About

The production Microscopes including microscope simulations, photo galleries, readings, and a quiz, is based on the 1925 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and the 1953 and 1986 Nobel Prizes in Physics, which all were awarded for the development of different kinds of microscope.

Content

First published: March 2002
Plug in requirements: Flash 6 (the quiz) and Shockwave 8.5 (the simulators) »
Sound: No
High score: No
Credits  »

- Why are different kinds of microscope needed?
- What can you see in a phase contrast microscope?
- What can you see in a fluorescence microscope?
- What can you see in a transmission electron microscope?
- What can you see in a scanning tunnelling microscope?

Microscopes - simulations

Here you can read and find out about different kinds of microscope - what you can see in them and how to prepare specimens for a particular microscope. You can also try the four different microscope simulators and watch and compare images taken with phase contrast microscopes, fluorescence microscopes, transmission electron microscopes and scanning tunnelling microscopes. Test your knowledge of microscopes by answering the 20 questions in the "Microscope quiz".

 

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MLA style: "Microscopes - About". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 18 Dec 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/physics/microscopes/about.html>

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