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A Quantum Theory for Atomic Structure

Enter Bohr…

 
Bohr doubted the validity of the plantary model of the atom as the revolving electrons would loose energy by emitting photons and promptly fall into the nucleus.
Bohr suggested that only certain stable electron orbits around the nucleus were allowed.
 

In 1912, the Dane, Niels Bohr, took up residence in Rutherford's laboratory in Manchester – he was 28 years old. He immediately set about trying to understand whether Rutherford's newly proposed 'planetary' model of the atom was correct. He was particularly worried that the revolving electron would radiate away its energy and fall into the nucleus.

Continuing with the theme of quantisation started by Planck, Bohr suggested that only certain stable electron orbits around the nucleus were allowed. He called these, stationary states, because electrons in these special orbits emitted no radiation in stark contrast to the predictions of classical physics.

Bohr and Planck standing in front of a blackboard, 1930.

 

 

Related Laureates

 The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1908 - Ernest Rutherford »  The Nobel Prize in Physics 1922 - Niels Henrik David Bohr »  
 



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