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Nobel Centennial Symposia

Frontiers of Molecular Science

December 4-7, 2001
Friiberghs Manor, Örsundsbro and Stockholm University
 
December 4
Introduction
Bengt Nordén (Chalmers University of Technology)
Overview and Scientific Appetizers
I. Fundamentals
Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology)
Dynamical Chemistry and Biology: From Fundamentals to Complexity
W. Moerner (Stanford University)
Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: from Low Temperature Physical Chemistry to Biophysics 
Richard N. Zare (Stanford University)
Prospects for Advances in Micro- and Nano-scale Chemical Analysis 
Rudolph A. Marcus (California Institute of Technology)
Unimolecular Reactions and the Strange Mass-Independent Isotope Effect in Chemistry 
Barry Ninham (Australian National University)
Flaws in the Fabric of Physical Chemistry 
 
December 5
II. Biological Systems
John E. Walker (MRC, Cambridge)
The Rotary Mechanism of ATP Synthase 
George P. Smith (University of Missouri-Columbia)
Selection Versus Design in Chemical Engineering 
Arthur L. Horwich (Yale University)
Chaperonin-assisted Polypeptide Folding  
Roger Kornberg (Stanford University)
Eukaryotic Gene Transcription at Atomic Resolution 
Peter B. Dervan (California Institute of Technology)
Regulation of Gene Expression by Synthetic DNA Binding Ligands  
Stephan Krauss (Rikshospitalet, Oslo)
Targeted Gene Conversion
Kurt Wüthrich (Institut für Molekularbiologie und Biophysik)
Meeting Future Demands of Structural Biology and Structural Genomics with NMR 
Tom Steitz (Yale University)
Functional Insights from the Structure of the Large Ribosomal Subunit and its Complexes with Ligands 
Aaron Klug (MRC, Cambridge)
Zinc Finger Peptides for Regulation of Gene Expression 
 
December 6
III. Synthesis
Jean-Marie Lehn (Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg)
Steps Towards Complex Matter: Information, Self- organization and Adaptation in Molecular and Supramolecular Systems 
K. Barry Sharpless
Engaging Enzymes in the Synthesis of Their Own Inhibitors
IV. Structures and Interfaces
Peter G. Schultz
Functional Molecules: A Lesson from Nature 
J. Fraser Stoddart (University of California, Los Angeles)
The Nature of the Mechanical Bond 
Gerhard Ertl (Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin)
Dynamics of Reactions at Solid Surfaces 
Final Remarks
Bengt Nordén
General Discussion
 
December 7
(Aula Magna, Frescati, Stockholm)
V. Chemistry in the New Century: "Molecules and Life"
Panel: Nordén, Zewail, Walker, Dervan, Corey, Whitesides
(Open part of Nobel Centennial Symposium)
Press Conference

 

Participants  
Per Ahlberg Göteborg University
Mikael Akke Lund University
Bo Albinsson CTH, Göteborg
Peter Brzezinski Stockholm University
Carl-Ivar Brändén Karolinska Institutet
Jan-Erling Bäckvall Stockholm University
Jan-Otto Carlsson Uppsala University
Ann-Kristin Danielsson The Royal Swedish Academy
Ylva Engström Stockholm University
Sture Forsén Lund University
Michael Freemantle Chem. & Eng. News
Ingmar Grenthe KTH, Stockholm
Salo Gronowitz Lund University
Astrid Gräslund Stockholm University
Peter Gölitz Angewandte Chemie
Gunnar von Heijne Stockholm University
Torleif Härd KTH, Stockholm
Jan Kihlberg Umeå University
Reiko Kuroda University of Tokyo
Torvard Laurent Uppsala University
Sven Lidin Stockholm University
Anders Liljas Lund University
Per Lincoln Göteborg University
Göran Lindblom Umeå University
Björn Lindman Lund University
Ylva Lindqvist Karolinska Institutet
Sara Linse Lund University
Karin Markides Uppsala University
Christina Moberg KTH, Stockholm

 

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