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  The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001     
       
 
 

Introduction

Organisms consist of cells that multiply through cell division. Before a cell can divide it has to grow in size, duplicate its chromosomes and separate the chromosomes for distribution between the two daughter cells. These different processes are coordinated in the cell cycle.

The cell cycle consists of several phases. In the first phase (G1) the cell grows. When it has reached its appropriate size it enters the phase of DNA-synthesis (S), where the chromosomes are duplicated. During the next phase (G2) the cell prepares for division. In mitosis (M) the chromosomes separate, and the cell divides into two daughter cells. Through this mechanism the daughter cells receive identical sets of chromosomes. After division, the cells are back in G1 and the cell cycle is completed. This year's Nobel Laureates have discovered fundamental mechanisms controlling the cell cycle. CDK and cyclin drive the cell from one phase to the next in the cell cycle.

 

   
 
   Contents:  
 
| The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001 | Introduction | Leland HartwellPaul Nurse |
Tim Hunt
| The Implications of the Discoveries |
Play the "Control of the Cell Cycle" game! 
Based on materials from the 2001 Nobel Poster for Physiology or Medicine
Credits  
Nobel Poster from the Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine, web adapted by Nobel Web
 


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