The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel

For Angus Deaton – awarded the Prize in Economic Sciences 2015 – fly fishing has helped him think in new and creative ways

© Nobel Media. Photo: Alexander Mahmoud

About the prize

In 1968, Sveriges Riksbank (Sweden’s central bank) established the Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, founder of the Nobel Prize. The prize is based on a donation received by the Nobel Foundation in 1968 from Sveriges Riksbank on the occasion of the bank’s 300th anniversary. The first prize in economic sciences was awarded to Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen in 1969.

The prize in economic sciences is awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, according to the same principles as for the Nobel Prizes that have been awarded since 1901.

See all economic sciences laureates or learn about the nomination process.

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel

This year’s laureates in economic sciences, Ben Bernanke, Douglas Diamond and Philip Dybvig, have significantly improved our understanding of the role of banks in the economy, particularly during financial crises. An important finding in their research is why avoiding bank collapses is vital.
The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2022

© Johan Jarnestad/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2022 was awarded to Ben S. Bernanke, Douglas W. Diamond, Philip H. Dybvig “for research on banks and financial crises”.

The Great Depression of the 1930s paralysed the world’s economies for many years and had vast societal consequences. However, we have managed subsequent financial crises better thanks to research insights from this year’s laureates. They have demonstrated the importance of preventing widespread bank collapses.
The 2022 economic sciences laureates

Ill. Niklas Elmehed © Nobel Prize Outreach

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Nobel Prizes and laureates

Laureate in economic sciences Bengt Holmström likes the Chinese board game GO, which begins with simple rules but gets difficult as one progresses.

Photo: Nobel Prize Museum

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Angus Deaton employed theory, data collection and statistics together to see how consumption, poverty, and welfare are related. His conclusion? We need to understand individual consumption choices before we can design economic policy that promotes welfare and reduces poverty.

Angus Deaton visiting the Vasa Museum during the Nobel week in Stockholm.

Angus Deaton visiting the Vasa Museum in Stockholm during Nobel Week.

© Nobel Media. Photo: Pi Frisk

Watch this interview with Dr. John Nash, who received the Prize in Economic Sciences in 1994. He talks about the impact the prize has had on his life, his talent for mathematics as a child and about the movie about his life, ‘A Beautiful Mind’.

John F. Nash Jr.

John F. Nash Jr., awarded the 1994 Prize in Economic Sciences.

Photo: Nobel Foundation archive

Read how ‘innumerable contracts’ hold modern economies together. The recipients of the 2016 Prize in Economic Sciences created theoretical tools for understanding real-life contracts and institutions, as well as potential pitfalls in contract design.

Bengt Holmström and Oliver Hart autograph a chair

Oliver Hart (left) and Bengt Holmström autograph a chair at the Nobel Museum.

Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT